Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend World Drug Delivery Summit Houston, USA..

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

M N V Ravi Kumar

Texas A&M Health Science Center, USA

Keynote: Sneaking through the intestinal barriers using polymer Nanosystems

Time : 10:00-10:30

OMICS International Drug Delivery 2015 International Conference Keynote Speaker M N V Ravi Kumar photo
Biography:

Ravi Kumar is the Professor at Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Texas A&M Health Science Center in College Station. His research in drug delivery has won him numerous awards including the British Pharmaceutical Conference Science Medal , UK (2009), Tom Gibson Memorial Award by British Society of Plastic Surgeons & the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons, UK (2008), Indian National Science Academy (INSA) Medal for Young Scientist, India (2007). He was awarded Alexander von Humboldt Research Fellowship, Germany (2002).

Abstract:

The innovator companies ideally look up to novel delivery technologies for extending the life-cycle of the many existing drugs that are or will be off patent to maintain their hold on the market. These delivery technologies are expected to not only extend the life-cycle but also the performance compared to the parent product. The delivery technologies have evolved from simple tablets and capsules to most sophisticated “nanosystems”. These nanosystems are not only capable of improving solubility and permeability limited bioavailability of vast majority of drugs/drug like compounds but also possibly target them to cell or tissue of interest. In this lecture, I present the progress we made in peroral drug delivery from passively absorbed nanosystems to receptor mediated delivery

OMICS International Drug Delivery 2015 International Conference Keynote Speaker Mohammad Refaat Khattab photo
Biography:

Mohammad Refaat Khattab has completed his PhD from Cairo University. He has a unique blend of experience between science and business as he was COO of one of the biggest generic pharmaceutical companies in Egypt – MENA. Also, he worked with Bristol - Myers Squibb for more than 8 years, in addition to his extraordinary and novel consultation projects in pharmaceutical industry in MENA region. This experience delivered to him the value chain in drug delivery and its impact on the commercial process and applied practice.

Abstract:

Although there is still room for growth in generics, delivering it has become more complex. Given that penetration rates are as high as 80 percent in the US and 70 percent in Central and Eastern Europe, significant potential exists for volume penetration in many markets. In addition, between $20 and $60 billion of originator sales will continue to go off-patent each year. However, generics companies face considerable challenges to their profitability and growth. The continent of Africa is becoming a large opportunity. The broader pharmaceuticals market, currently estimated at $18 to $19 billion, is expected to grow to about $50 billion by 2020, representing an annual growth rate of 12 percent. Generics are one of the most vibrant sectors of the market. Worth $4 billion, it is expected to reach $18 billion by 2020 on annual growth of 22 percent. This review will illustrate a full scope picture based on more than 18 years of visual management in the industry and consultation in MENA region in addition to the authorized reports and statistics which draw a map for market players.

OMICS International Drug Delivery 2015 International Conference Keynote Speaker Hidetaka Akita photo
Biography:

Hidetaka Akita received Ph.D. degrees (Pharmaceutical Sciences) from The University of Tokyo in 2002. After a Research Fellowship for young scientists from the Japan Society for the Promotion of Sciences (JSPS), he was appointed to the Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Hokkaido University. He was promoted to the rank of an associate professor in 2010. \\r\\nIn 2010, he received the Incentive Award from The Academy of Pharmaceutical Science and Technology, Japan (APSTJ). In 2011, he won The Pharmaceutical Society of Japan Award for Young Scientists. In 2013, he won The encouragement award from The Japan Society of Drug Delivery System\\r\\n

Abstract:

A category of biomedicine is now expanding from low-molecular drugs to the recombinant protein, antibody, and nucleic acids (i.e. siRNA, mRNA and plasmid DNA). While the gene therapy approach has faced technical and/or regulatory impediments, a large number of clinical trials are still ongoing worldwide. One crucial success is the first approval of the Glybera® (UniQure) by the European Medicinal Agency (EMA) as a first gene-based medication\\r\\nGene expression efficacy is rate-limited by the multiple processes (i.e. cellular uptake, endosomal escape, cytoplasmic transport and nuclear delivery). Adequate design to overcome these barriers is a minimum requirement. Our quantitative and mechanism-based information on differences in transfection efficiency between viral and artificial cationic vectors revealed that post-nuclear delivery processes (i.e. transcription and translation) predominantly contributed to the poor transfection efficacy in artificial ones in dividing cells. In other words, the process of the post-organelle delivery process (intra-organelle disposition) should be taken into the consideration.\\r\\nIn this presentation, I’ll propose two strategies to enhance/maximize these processes. First strategy is to develop a neutral nanoparticle in those the use of the cationic material is minimized. As an example, I’ll focus on the concept of SS-cleavable and pH-activated lipid-like materials (ssPalm), that are designed to collapse in response to the intracellular environment to accelerate the “decapsulation/release” of nucleic acids (DNA and siRNA). \\r\\nAs another strategy, I’ll propose a particle that mounts a “Switch-on” function as a trigger of signal transduction, and stimulation of transcription. As an example, I’ll summarize the dendritic cell-targeted gene delivery for the DNA vaccine.\\r\\n\\r\\n

Keynote Forum

Saravanan Muniyandy

Monash University, Malaysia

Keynote: Carboxymethyl sago pulp: A smart polymer for pH sensitive release

Time : 11:45-12:15

OMICS International Drug Delivery 2015 International Conference Keynote Speaker Saravanan Muniyandy  photo
Biography:

Saravanan has completed his Masters in Pharmaceutics at the age of 24 years and PhD at the age of 32 years from Chennai, India. He has also completed GCHE at Monash University. Saravanan has nearly 20 years of experience in teaching pharmacy graduates and supervising research students. Presently, He is the Deputy Head of School of Pharmacy, Monash University, Malaysia. He has published more than 30 research papers in reputed journals and has been serving as peer reviewer for several high-quality journals. He is also an editorial board member of reputed journals.

Abstract:

Carboxymethyl sago pulp (CMSP) with a degree of substitution of 0.4% was synthesized from Malaysian sago biomass. Because of the carboxyl functional group, CMSP shows a pH depended solubility. Drug loaded CMSP beads were formed by ionotropic gelation and further cross-linked by irradiation. 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA), a model drug was encapsulated in CMSP beads to target the release in the colon. Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction studies indicated intact and amorphous nature of entrapped drug. The beads showed pH dependent sustained release over 9 h, and more than 90% of the drug was released only at pH 7.4. Irradiated beads were resisted the drug release in acidic environment at a higher extent than the non-irradiated beads. The swelling behaviour of the beads depended on polymer content and extent of cross-linking. The release exponent n value suggested a non-Fickian transport of 5-ASA.